Lewis & Short

No entries found. Showing closest matches:

tălentum, i (gen. plur. talentum, Cic. Rab. Post. 8, 21; Liv. 30, 16, 12 et saep.; rarely talentorum, Suet. Caes. 54), n. [τάλαντον, a thing weighed, a weight; hence], a talent, i. e.,

  1. I. A Grecian weight, varying in different states, usually about half a hundred-weight (very rare): auri eborisque talenta, Verg. A. 11, 333: thynni, Plin. 9, 15, 17, § 44: turis, id. 12, 17, 40, § 80.
  2. II. A sum of money, likewise varying in amount.
        1. a. The Attic talent, which is most usually meant, contained sixty minæ, i. e. £243 15s. sterling ($1182.19 in American gold): cum legati ab Alexandro quinquaginta ei talenta attulissent, quae erat pecunia temporibus illis, Athenis praesertim, maxima, Cic. Tusc. 5, 32, 91: decem milia talantum, id. Rab. Post. 8, 21; Plaut. Most. 3, 1, 114; 4, 2, 10; id. Truc. 5, 60; Varr. ap. Plin. 35, 11, 40, § 136: argenti, Verg. A. 5, 112; Hor. Ep. 1, 6, 34; id. S. 2, 3, 226; 2, 7, 89 al.; cf. Rhem. Fan. Pond. 37 sq.; Fest. p. 359.
          Sometimes called also magnum, C. Gracch. ap. Gell. 11, 10, 6; Plaut. Truc. 4, 3, 71; id. Most. 3, 1, 110; id. Cist. 2, 3, 19.
        2. b. Another talent of eighty minæ, Liv. 38, 38.
        3. c. The Egyptian talent, Varr. ap. Plin. 33, 3, 15, § 52.