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Făcĕlīnus (Phac-), a, um, or Făcĕ-lītis (Phac-), or Fascĕlis (Phasc-), ĭdis, f. [φάκελος, a bundle of fagots], of or belonging to the Taurian Diana: sedes Dianae, Sil. 14, 260 dub.; v. Gerlach ad Lucil. p. 11; cf. Serv. Verg. A. 116; Hyg. Fab. 261.

făla (phal-), ae, f. [falae dictae ab altitudine, a falando, quod apud Etruscos significat caelum, Paul. ex Fest. p. 88, 12 Müll.], a scaffolding of boards or planks, a scaffold.

  1. I. A structure used in sieges, from which missiles were thrown into a city: malos diffindunt, fiunt tabulata falaeque, Enn. ap. Non. 114, 7 (Ann. v. 389 ed. Vahl.).
    Prov.: subire sub falas, i. e. to run a great risk for a slight gain, Plaut. Most. 2, 1, 10.
  2. II. One of the seven wooden pillars in the spina of the Circus, Juv. 6, 590; cf. Anthon’s Dict. of Antiq. p. 254, a.

fălārĭca (phal-), ae, f. [fala],

  1. I. a sort of missile wrapped with tow and pitch, set on fire, and thrown by the catapult (cf. for syn.: tragula, sagitta, sparus, spicula, telum, missile, etc.), Liv. 21, 8, 10 sq.; Sil. 1, 351; 9, 239; Luc. 6, 198; Veg. Mil. 4, 18.
  2. II. Transf., a similar missile thrown by hand, Verg. A. 9, 705; Enn. ap. Non. 555, 15 (Ann. v. 534 ed. Vahl.); Liv. 34, 14, 11; Grat. Cyneg. 342.

pagrus (phagr-) or păger (ph-), ri, m., = πάγρος (φάγρος), a fish, otherwise unknown: pagrus fluviatilis, Plin. 32, 10, 38, § 113; 9, 16, 2, § 57.

Phăcĕlīnus, a, um, v. Facelinus.

Phacus, i, m., = Φάκος, a fortified place near Pella in Macedonia, where the treasury of the Macedonian kings was kept, Liv. 44, 6, 2: Arx Phacus, id. 44, 46, 6.

Phaeāces, um, m., = Φαίακες, the Phœacians, the fabled luxurious inhabitants of the isle of Scheria (in historic times, Corcyra), Cic. Brut. 18, 71; Verg. A. 3, 291; Ov. M. 13, 719; Juv. 5, 151.
In sing.: Phae-ax, ācis, m., a Phœacian; transf., of a man in good case, Hor. Ep. 1, 15, 24.
As adj.: Phaeax populus, Juv. 15, 23.
Hence,

  1. A. Phaeācĭa, ae, f., = Φαιακία, the country of the Phœacians, the isle of Scheria (Corcyra), in the Ionian Sea: Corcyra Homero dicta Scheria et Phaeacia, Callimacho etiam Drepane, Plin. 4, 12, 19, § 52; Tib. 1, 3, 3.
  2. B. Phaeācis, ĭdis, adj., = Φαιακίς, Phœacian; subst.: Phaeācis, ĭdis, f. (sc. Musa), a poem on the sojourn of Ulysses in Phœacia, Ov. P. 4, 12, 27; 16, 27.
  3. C. Phaeācĭus, a, um, adj., = Φαιάκιος, Phœacian: tellus, Tib. 4, 1, 78; Ov. Am. 3, 9, 47.
  4. D. Phaeācus, a, um, adj., = Φαίακος, Phœacian: silvae, Prop. 3 (4), 1, 51.

phaecăsĭa, ae, v. phaecasium.

phaecăsĭāni dii [phaecasium], a sort of deities of whom nothing further is known (perh. shod with phaecasia), Juv. 3, 218 (al. phaecasiati).

phaecăsĭātus, a, um, adj. [phaecasium], shod with phaecasia: milites, Petr. 72: quae decent phaecasiatum palliatumque, i. e. a Grecian philosopher, Sen. Ep. 113, 2.

phaecăsĭum, ii, n., and phaecă-sĭa, ae, f., = Φαικάσιον, a kind of white shoe, worn at Athens by the priests, Sen. Ben. 7, 21, 1: inauratae, Petr. 67.

Phaedo or Phaedon, ōnis, m., = Φαίδων, a disciple of Socrates and friend of Plato, after whom Plato has named his dialogue on the immortality of the soul, Cic. N. D. 1, 33, 93; Gell. 2, 18, 1; Lact. 3, 25, 15; Sid. Ep. 2, 9.

Phaedra, ae, f., = Φαίδρα, the daughter of king Minos, of Crete, sister of Ariadne and wife of Theseus; she slew herself for hopeless love of Hippolytus, Verg. A. 6, 445; Ov. A. A. 1, 511; id. H. 4, 74; Sen. Hippol. 434; cf. Serv. Verg. A. 6, 14; Hyg. Fab. 47; 243.

Phaedrĭas or Phaedrĭa, ae, m., a male proper name, Ter. Eun. 1, 2, 15.

Phaedrus (nom. PHAEDER, Inscr. Grut. 1111, 3), i, m., = Φαῖδρος.

  1. I. A pupil of Socrates, a native of Myrsinus, in Attica, after whom Plato named one of his dialogues, Cic. de Or. 1, 7, 28; id. Or. 4, 15; 12, 39; id. Fin. 2, 2, 4; id. Tusc. 1, 22, 53 al.
  2. II. An Epicurean philosopher of Athens, an instructor of Cicero, Cic. Fam. 13, 1, 2; id. Fin. 1, 5, 16; id. N. D. 1, 33, 93; id. Phil. 5, 5, 13.
  3. III. A freedman of Augustus, a Thracian by birth, and author of some well-known Latin fables.

phaenĭon, ĭi, n., = φαινίον, a plant, the anemone, Plin. 21, 23, 94, § 164 (al. phrenion, v. Sillig ad h. l.).

phaenŏmĕnon, i, n., = φαινόμενον, an appearance.

  1. I. In gen. (post-class.), Theod. Prisc. 2, 7.
  2. II. In partic.
    1. A. phaenŏmĕna, ōrum, n. plur., = φαινόμενα, appearances in the air or sky, Lact. 2, 5, 11.
    2. B. Phaenomena, the title of a poem by Aratus.

Phaenon, ōnis, m., = Φαίνων (shining), the planet Saturn (post-class.): quae Stilbon volvat, quae secula Phaenon, Aus. Idyll. 18, 11; Mart. Cap. 8, § 886.
In the Gr. acc. Phaenona, Mart. Cap. 8, § 851 (written as Greek, Cic. N. D. 2, 20, 52).

Phaestum, i, n., = Φαῖστος.

  1. I. A town of Crete, near Cortyna, founded by Minos, Plin. 4, 12, 20, § 59.
    Hence,
    1. A. Phae-stĭas, ădis, f., = Φαιστιάς, a female inhabitant of Phœstum, a Phœstian (poet.): inter Phaestiadas, Ov. M. 9, 715.
    2. B. Phae-stĭus, a, um, adj., = Φαίστιος, of or belonging to Phœstum, Phœstian: tellus, Ov. M. 9, 668: Apollo, Plin. 4, 3, 4, § 7.
  2. II. A town of Thessaly, on the Eurotas, Liv. 36, 13, 3.
  3. III. A town of Locris, in Greece, Plin. 4, 3, 4, § 7.

Phăĕthon (dissyl.: fulmine Phaethon, Varr. ap. Quint. 1, 5, 18), ontis, m., = Φαέθων (the shining one). Son of Helios and Clymene, who, having obtained from his father permission to drive the sun’s chariot for a day, lost control of the steeds, and was struck down by a thunderbolt of Jupiter, to prevent his setting the earth on fire, Cic. Off. 3, 25, 94; id. N. D. 3, 31, 76; cf.: Phaëthontem orbi terrarum educare, Suet. Calig. 11; Ov. M. 2, 47 sq.; Verg. A. 10, 189.

  1. B. An epithet of the sun (poet.), Verg. A. 5, 105; Sil. 6, 3.
    Hence,
  1. A. Phăĕ-thontēus, a, um, adj., = Φαεθόντειος, of or belonging to Phaëthon, Phaëthontean (poet.): ignes, Ov. M. 4, 246: Padus (because Phaëthon is said to have fallen into the Padus), Mart. 10, 12, 2: favilla, i. e. fulmen, Stat. Th. 1, 221: umbra, i. e. of the poplar (because the sisters of Phaëthon were changed into poplars), Mart. 6, 15, 1.
  2. B. Phăĕthontĭas, ădis, f., = Φαεθοντιάς, a Phaëthontiad, i. e. a sister of Phaëthon. They wept for their brother, and were changed into poplars (acc. to others, into alders), while their tears were converted into amber: Phaëthontiadum silva sororum, Sen. Herc. Oet. 185; Verg. E. 6, 62; cf. Ov. M. 2, 340 sqq.
  3. C. Phăĕthentis, ĭdis, f., = Φαεθοντίς, subst., i. q. Phaëthontias, a Phaëthontiad, a sister of Phaëthon (poet.), Avien. Arat. 792.
    As adj., of or belonging to Phaëthon, Phaëthontian: gutta, amber (into which the tears of Phaëthon’s sisters were said to be converted), Mart. 4, 32, 1.
  4. D. Phăĕthontĭus, a, um, adj., = Φαεθόντιος.
    1. 1. Of or belonging to Phaëthon, Phaëthontian: fabula, Stat. S. 2, 4, 9: amnis, i.e. Padus (v. Phaëthonteus), Sil. 7, 149.
    2. 2. Of or belonging to the sun: ora, the sun’s disk, Sil. 10, 110.

Phăĕthūsa, ae, f., = Φαέθουσα (the shining one), a sister of Phaëthon, Ov. M. 2, 346.

phăgĕdaena, ae, f., = φαγέδαινα (voracity).

      1. 1. A diseased and excessive appetite, voracity, Cael. Aur. Tard. 3, 3, 46; plur., Plin. 26, 11, 68, § 110.
        As a disease of bees, Col. 9, 13, 10 (written as Greek).
        Hence,
      2. 2. An eating ulcer, a cancer, Plin. 23, 7, 63, § 123.

phăgĕdaenĭcus, a, um, adj., = φαγεδαινικός, spreading like a cancer, can-cerous: vulnera, Plin. 24, 4, 5, § 9.

    1. 2. Transf., of persons, suffering from cancers, cancerous: phagedaenici, Cael. Aur. Tard. 3, 3, 47.

phăger (pa-) or phăgrus (pa-), i, m., = φάγρος, a fish, Plin. 32, 11, 53, § 150; Ov. Hal. 107; plur., Plin. 9, 16, 24, § 57; 32, 10, 38, § 113.

Phăgīta, ae, m. [φάγω, to eat], a Roman surname, Suet. Caes. 74.

phăgo, ōnis, m., = φάγος, φαγών, a glutton, gormandizer (ante-and post-class.): edones et phagones ab edacitate, unum Latinum, aliud Graecum, Non. 48, 17 sq.; Varr. ap. Non. l. l.; Vop. Aur. 50.

phăgrus, v. phager.

phăla, ae, v. fala.

Phalacrīnē, ēs, and Phalacrīna, ae, f., a town in the Sabine territory, the birthplace of the emperor Vespasian, Suet. Vesp. 2.

phălacrŏ-cŏrax, ăcis, m., = φαλακροκόραξ, a coot or cormorant (pure Lat. corvus aquaticus): phalacrocoraces, aves Balearium insularum peculiares, Plin. 10, 48, 68, § 133; cf. id. 11, 37, 47, § 130.

Phălaecus, i, m., = Φάλαικος,

  1. I. an ancient Greek poet, from whom a kind of verse is named Phalaecium, Phalaecum, or Phaleucium carmen. This verse is hendecasyllabic, consisting of a spondee, a dactyl, and three trochees (e. g. vidi credite per lacus Lucrinos), Aus. Ep. 4, 85; Diom. p. 509 P.; Terentian. p. 2440 ib.; Mart. Cap. 5, § 517: metrum Phalaecium, Mar. Victor. 2566 P.: carmen Phalaecum, Sulp. Sat. 4.
  2. II. A tyrant of Phocœa; whence Phă-laecēus, a, um, Phalœcean, of Phalœcus: nex, Ov. Ib. 504.

phălangae and pălangae, ārum, f. plur., = φάλαγγες.

  1. I. In gen., a pole to carry burdens on, carrying-pole, Vitr. 10, 3, 7: proelium Afri contra Aegyptios primum fecere fustibus, quos vocant phalangas, Plin. 7, 56, 57, § 260; 12, 4, 8, § 17.
  2. II. In partic., a wooden roller, to place under ships and military machines for the purpose of moving them along (class.), Varr. ap. Non. 163, 23 sq.; Caes. B. C. 2, 10 fin.

1. phălangārĭus or pălangā-rĭus (in inscrr. also PALANCARIVS and FALANCARIVS), ii, m. [phalangae], one who carries burdens with the aid of a long pole, a carrier, porter, Vitr. 10, 3, 7; Non. 163, 23 sq. (v. phalanga); Inscr. Fabr. p. 10; Inscr. Giorn. Pisan. tom. 16, p. 192; Inscr. Marin. Atti, p. 151; Inscr. Kellerm. ap. Orell. Analect. Epigr. (Index Lection. Acad. Turic. Aestiv. 1838), p. 43, 4090.

2. phălangārĭus, ii, m. [phalanx], a soldier belonging to a phalanx, a phalangary (post-class.), Lampr. Alex. Sev. 50, 5 (cf. phalangitae).

phălangĭon, ii, n., v. phalangium.

phălangītae, ārum, m., = φαλαγγῖται, soldiers belonging to a phalanx, phalangites, Liv. 37, 40, 1; 5; 42, 51.

phălangītes, ae, m., = φαλαγγίτης, spider-root: Anthericum liliastrum, Linn.; Plin. 27, 12, 98, § 124.

phălangĭum or -on, ii, n. (late collat. form phălangĭus, ii, m., Veg. Vet. 3, 81; Isid. 14, 6, 16), = φαλάγγιον.

  1. I. A kind of venomous spider, Cels. 5, 27, 9; Plin. 18, 17, 44, § 156; 8, 27, 41, § 97; 11, 24, 28, § 79.
  2. II. Spider-root, anthericum, for phalangites, Plin. 27, 12, 98, § 124.

(phălango or pălango, āre, v. a. [phalanga], to carry away on a pole (anteclass.), Afran. ap. Perotti Cornucop. ad Epigr. 115. The passage is otherwise unknown.)

Phalannaeus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Phalanna, a city of Thessaly, Phalannœan: ager, Liv. 42, 65.

Phălantus, i, m., = Φάλαντος, a Spartan who emigrated to Italy and there founded Tarentum: et regnata petam Laconi Rura Phalanto, i.e. Tarentum, Hor. C. 2, 6, 11; Just. 3, 4, 7.
Hence,

  1. A. Phă-lantēus, a, um, adj., Phalantean: Phalanteum Tarentum, Sil. 11, 16.
  2. B. Phă-lantīnus, a, um, adj., Phalantine, poet. for Tarentine: Phalantinus Galesus, Mart. 5, 37, 2.
  3. C. Phălanthum, i, n., poetic name for the city of Tarentum, Mart. 8, 28, 3.

phălanx (post-class. fălanx), angis, f., = φάλαγξ.

  1. I. In gen.
    1. A. Lit., a band of soldiers, a host drawn up in close order (poet.): Agamemnoniae phalanges, Verg. A. 6, 489: densae, id. ib. 12, 662: Tuscorum, id. ib. 12, 551: animosa (said of eight brothers fighting together), id. ib. 12, 277: junctae umbone phalanges, Juv. 2, 46.
    2. B. Trop., a host, multitude (postclass.): culparum, Prud. Psych. 816.
  2. II. In partic.
    1. A. Among the Athenians and Spartans, a division of an army drawn up in battle array, a battalion, phalanx, Nep. Chabr. 1, 2; id. Pelop. 4, 2.
    2. B. The Macedonian order of battle, a Macedonian phalanx (a compact parallelogram of fifty men abreast and sixteen deep), Nep. Eum. 7, 1; Curt. 3, 2, 13; Liv. 31, 39, 10; cf.: quae (cohortes) cuneum Macedonum (phalangem ipsi vocant) perrumperent, id. 32, 17, 11: fecerat et falangem triginta milium hominum, Lampr. Alex. Sev. 50, 5.
      1. 2. An order of battle of the Gauls and Germans, forming a parallelogram: Helvetii confertissimā acie, phalange factā, etc., Caes. B. G. 1, 24; 1, 52: phalangem perfringere, id. ib. 1, 25.

Phălăra, ōrum, n., = Φάλαρα, a harbor of Phthiotis, in Thessaly, on the Sinus Maliacus, now Stillida, Liv. 27, 30, 3; 12; Plin. 4, 7, 12, § 27.

phălārĭca, v falarica.

1. phălăris (phălēris), ĭdis, f., = φαλαρίς or φαληρίς.

  1. I. The plant canarygrass (Phalaris canariensis, Linn.), Plin. 27, 12, 102, § 126.
  2. II. A water-hen, coot, Varr. R. R. 3, 11 fin.; Col. 8, 15; Plin. 10, 48, 67, § 132.

2. Phălăris, ĭdis (acc. Phalarin, Claud. B. Gild. 186), m., = Φάλαρις, a tyrant of Agrigentum, for whom Perillus made a brazen bull, in which those condemned by him were to be roasted alive. He caused Perillus to be the first to suffer by it (v. Perillus), but afterwards experienced the same punishment himself at the hands of his exasperated subjects, Cic. Off. 2, 7, 26; id. Att. 7, 20, 2; id. Rep. 1, 28, 44; id. N. D. 3, 33, 82; id. Verr. 2, 4, 33, § 73; Juv. 8, 81; Plin. 7, 56, 57, § 200; Ov. A. A. 1, 653; Sil. 14, 211; Amm. 28, 1, 26; Claud. B. Gild. 186.

Phalasarnēus, a, um, adj., = Φαλασαρνεῖος, of or belonging to the Cretan city of Phalasarne, Phalasarnean, Liv. 42, 51; cf. Plin. 4, 12, 20, § 57.

phălĕrae, ārum (neutr. phalera posita, Plin. 33, 1, 6, § 18; Jan. phaleras), f., = τὰ φάλαρα.

  1. I. Lit.
    1. A. A smooth, shining ornament for the breast, a metal disc or boss, worn by men, esp. as a military decoration: phalerae sunt belli ornamenta, Non. 554, 15 sq.; Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 12, § 29: phaleris et torque aliquem donare id. ib. 2, 3, 80: phaleras deponere, Liv. 9, 46; cf. Plin. 33, 1, 6, § 18: phaleris hic pectora fulget, Sil. 15, 255.
      As a military mark of distinction: equites donati phaleris, Liv. 39, 31; Verg. A. 9, 458 Heyn. and Wagn.; Juv. 16, 60.
      Worn by women: matrona ornata phaleris pelagiis, P. Syrus ap. Petr. 55.
    2. B. A trapping for the forehead and breast of horses, Liv. 32, 52: primus equum phaleris insignem victor habeto, Verg. A. 5, 310; Plin. 37, 12, 74, § 194; Juv. 11, 103.
      As a trapping for elephants, Gell. 5, 5, 3.
  2. II. Trop., an external ornament or decoration (poet. and in post-class. prose): ad populum phaleras! trappings for the people! who allow themselves to be deceived by externals, Pers. 3, 30.
    Of rhetorical ornament, Mart. Cap. 3, § 221: loquendi, Symm. Ep. 83: heroicorum, Sid. Ep. 1, 9 fin.

Phălēreus, i, and Phălērĭcus, a, um, v. Phalerum.

phălēris, v. 1. phalaris.

phălĕro, āre, v. a. [phalerae],

  1. I. to adorn with trappings, ornament the breast (late Lat.): animalia phalerari sibi magis quam nodari gaudent, Ambros. Cant. Cantic. 1, 43.
    Fig., to deck, set off, display: eloquentiae phalerandae gratiā, Ambros. Off. Min. 1, 12, 44.
    Hence, phălĕrātus, a, um, adj. I. Lit., wearing an ornament for the forehead and breast: equi, Liv. 30, 17: cursor, Petr. 28: turba Mazacum atque cursorum, Suet. Ner. 30.
  2. II. Trop., decorated, ornamented: phaleratis dictis aliquem ducere, with fine speeches, Ter Phorm. 3, 2, 16.

Phălērum, i, n., = Φαληρόν, the oldest harbor of Athens, connected with the city by a long wall, with a demos of the same name belonging to it, Plin. 4, 7, 11, § 24.
Hence,

  1. A. Phălēreus (mostly trisyl.), ĕi and ĕos, m., = Φαληρεύς, of or from Phalerum, a Phalerian: Demetrius Phalereus, or simply Phalereus, a ruler of Athens and a famous orator, about B. C. 300, Cic. Leg. 2, 25, 64; id. Fin. 5, 19, 54; id. Div. 2, 46, 96; Nep. Milt. 6, 4.
    Scanned as a quadrisyllable: Demetrius, qui dictus est Phalereus, Phaedr. 5, 1, 1.
    Acc.: Phalerea, Quint. 2, 4, 41; 10, 1, 80.
  2. B. Phălērĭcus, a, um, adj., = Φαληρικός, Phalerian: portus, Nep. Them. 6, 1.
    As subst.: Phălērĭcus, i, m. (sc. portus), = Phalerum, in Phalericum descendere, Cic. Fin. 5, 2, 5; cf.: in Phalerico, Plin. 2, 103, 106, § 225.

Phăleucĭus, a, um, v. Phalaecus.

Phaliscus, v. Faliscus.

phallovitrobŏlus, i, m., or -vitro-bŏlum, i, n., a drinking-vessel shaped like a phallus, Capitol. Pertin. 8, 5 dub. (Momms. vitro, fundibuli).

phallus, i, m., = φαλλός, a figure of an obscene shape, carried about at the festival of Bacchus, originally a symbol of the generative power of nature; a phallus, Arn. 5, 176; cf. Aug. Civ. Dei, 7, 21.

Phănae, ārum, f., = Φαναί,

  1. I. a harbor and promontory in the isle of Chios, noted for its wine, Liv. 36, 43, 11.
    Hence,
  2. II. Phănaeus, a, um, adj., Phanœan: rex Phanaeus, the king of Phanœ, poet. of Phanœan wine, Verg. G. 2, 98.

phănĕrōsis, is, f., = φανέρωσις, a manifestation, revelation (eccl. Lat.), Tert. adv. Haer. 30.

Phănŏtē, ēs, and Phănŏtēa, ae, f., = Φανότη, Φανότεια, the name of several cities.

  1. I. A city in Epirus, with a castle, Liv. 43, 21.
  2. II. A city in Phocis, also called Panope, Liv. 32, 18.

phantăsĭa, ae, f., = φαντασία,

  1. I. an idea, notion, fancy (post-Aug.): Nicetas longe disertius hanc phantasiam movit, Sen. Suas. 2, 15: cor tuum phantasias patitur, Vulg. Ecclus. 34, 6.
    As a term of reproach: phantasia, non homo, a mere notion or fancy, the mere semblance of a man, Petr. 38 fin. (in Cic. Ac. 1, 11, 40; 2, 6, 8 al., written as Greek, and translated visum).
  2. II. A phantom, apparition: (animus) colli-git visa nocturna, quas phantasias nos adpellamus, Amm. 14, 11, 18.

phantasma, ătis, n., = φάντασμα.

  1. I. An apparition, spectre, phantom (postAug.; cf.: idolon, imago, simulacrum): velim scire, esse phantasmata et habere figuram … an inania, etc., Plin. Ep. 7, 27, 1: si phantasma fuit Christus, Tert. adv. Marc. 5, 7; Vulg. Matt. 14, 26; id. Marc. 6, 49.
  2. II. In gen., an image, appearance, phantasm of an object (late Lat. for visum, imago, species): Alexandriam cum eloqui volo, quam nunquam vidi, praesto est apud me phantasma ejus, Aug. Trinit. 8, 6.

phantasmătĭcus, a, um, adj. [phantasma], fantastic, imaginary, Isid. 8, 9, 7.

Phantăsos, i, m., = Φάντασος, a son of Somnus, Ov. M. 11, 642.

phantastĭcē, adv., by the fancy (eccl. Lat.), Nebrid. ap. Aug. Ep. 8.

phantastĭcus, a, um, adj., = φανταστικός, imaginary, Cassiod. An. 2; Fulg. Myth. 3, 10.

Phăon, ōnis, m., = Φάων.

  1. I. A youth of Lesbos beloved by Sappho without return, Ov. H. 15, 11; Plin. 22, 8, 9, § 20; Mart. 10, 35, 18.
    As a prov. of coldness, Plaut. Mil. 4, 6, 32.
  2. II. Phăon, ontis, m., a freedman of the emperor Nero, Suet. Ner. 48 and 49.

Phăraeus, a, um, adj., = Φαραῖος, of or belonging to the city of Pharœ, Pharœan: duces, Stat. Th. 2, 163.

phāranītis, ĭdis, f., pharanitis, a kind of amethyst, Plin. 37, 9, 40, § 122.

Phărăo, ōnis, m., = Φαραώ (Hebrew [??]), Pharaoh, the title of the Egyptian kings: Pharao nomen est non hominis, sed honoris, sicut apud nos Augusti appellantur reges, cum propriis nominibus censeantur, Isid. Orig. 7, 6; Prud. Cath. 12, 141; Vulg. Gen. 12, 15 et saep.

phărē̆tra, ae, f., = φαρέτρα.

  1. I. Lit., a quiver for holding arrows (poet. and late Lat.): succinctam pharetrā, Verg. A. 1, 323: nec venenatis gravida sagittis, Fusce, pharetra, Hor. C. 1, 22, 3: pharetram solvere, to undo, open, Ov. M. 5, 379: venatricis puellae (Dianae), Juv. 13, 80: in pharetrā suā abscondit me, Vulg. Isa. 49, 2; Verg. G. 2, 125; Prop. 2, 9, 10; Ov. P. 4, 13, 38; id. Am. 3, 9, 7; Val. Fl. 3, 607; Stat. Th. 4, 259 al.
  2. II. Transf., a kind of sundial in the form of a quiver, Vitr. 9, 8, 1.

phărē̆trātus, a, um, adj. [pharetra], furnished with or wearing a quiver, quivered (poet.): pharetrata Camilla, Verg. A. 11, 649: Persis, id. G. 4, 290: Geloni, Hor. C. 3, 4, 35: puer, i. e. Cupid, Ov. M. 10, 525: virgo, i.e. Diana, id. Am. 1, 1, 10: Semiramis, Juv. 2, 108.

phăretra-zōnĭum, ii, n., a quiverbelt, Not. Tir. p. 126.

phărē̆trĭger, ĕra, ĕrum, adj. [pharetragero], quiver-bearing (poet.): clade pharetrigeri regis, i. e. of the Persian king Xerxes: regis, Sil. 14, 286.

Phărĭa ūva, a kind of grape in the neighborhood of Pisa, Plin. 14, 3, 4, § 39.

Phărĭăcus, a, um, v. Pharus, A.

phārĭcon or -um, i, n., = φαρικόν, a kind of poison, so named from its inventor, Pharicus, Plin. 28, 10, 41, § 158.

Phāris, is, f., = Φᾶρις, a city in Messenia, afterwards called Pharae or Pherae, Stat. Th. 4, 226.

Phărĭsaeus, i, m., = Φαρισαῖος, a Pharisee, a member of the Jewish sect of that name, usually in plur.: Phărĭsaei (Pharīsaei, Juvenc. 2, 574), ōrum, m., = Φαρισαῖοι, the Pharisees, a Jewish sect (eccl. Lat.), Tert. Praescr. 45; Isid. 7, 6, 40; Juvenc. 3, 221; Vulg. Marc. 2, 16 et saep.
Sing.: secundum legem Pharisaeus, Vulg. Phil. 3, 5.
Hence,

  1. A. Phărĭsaeus, a, um, adj., = Φαρισαῖος, Pharisœan: convivia, Sedul. 4, 66; Tert. adv. Marc. 5, 20.
  2. B. Phărĭsăĭcus, a, um, adj., = Φαρισαικός, Pharisaic: sepulcra, Hier. adv. Vigil. n. 9.

Phărītae, ārum, and Phărĭus, a, um, v. Pharus, C. and B.

pharmăceutĭcus, a, um, adj., φαρμακευτικός, of or belonging to drugs, pharmaceutical, Cael. Aur. Tard. 5, 10, 126.

pharmăceutrĭa, ae, f., = φαρμακεύτρια, a sorceress (poet.), Verg. E. 8 in lemm.

pharmăcŏpōla, ae, m., = φαρμακοπώλης, a vender of medicines, a quack (class.), Cato ap. Gell. 1, 15, 9: circumforaneus, Cic. Clu. 14, 40; Hor. S. 1, 2, 1.

pharmăcus, i, m., = φαρμακός, a poisoner, a sorcerer (post-Aug.), Petr. 107, 15.

Pharmăcūsa, ae, f., = Φαρμακοῦσα, an island of the Ægean Sea, south-west from Miletus, where Cœsar was taken by pirates, now Farmako, Suet. Caes. 4; Plin. 4, 12, 23, § 71.

Pharnăbāzus, i, m., = Φαρνάβαζος, Pharnabazus, a Persian satrap under Darius Nothus and Artaxerxes, 412 to 377 B.C., Nep. Lys. 4, 1; Just. 5, 4, 1 al.

pharnăcēon, i, n., v. pharnacion.

Pharnăces, is, m., = Φαρνάκης.

  1. I. The name of two kings of Pontus.
    1. A. Grandfather of Mithridates, Just. 38, 6, 2; Plin. 33, 12, 54, § 151.
    2. B. Son of Mithridates, defeated by Cœsar, Cic. Deiot. 5, 14; id. Att. 11, 21, 2; Suet. Caes. 37; Luc. 10, 476.
  2. II. The name of a slave of Cicero, Cic. Att. 13, 30, 2; 13, 44, 3.

pharnăcīŏn (-ēon), ii, n., = φαρνάκειον, a species of the plant panax, named for Pharnaces, Plin. 25, 4, 14, § 33.

pharnuprium, i, n., a kind of figwine, Plin. 14, 16, 19, § 102 Jan.

Phăros, i, v. Pharus.

Pharsālos or Pharsālus, i, f., = Φάρσαλος, a city in Thessaly, where Cœsar defeated Pompey, now Fersala, Liv. 32, 33; 34, 23; 36, 14; Luc. 6, 350.
Hence,

  1. A. Pharsālĭcus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Pharsalus, Pharsalian: acies, Cic. Phil. 2, 29, 71: proelium, Cœsar’s victory over Pompey, id. Deiot. 5, 13; 10, 29: acies, id. Lig. 3, 9: annus, Luc. 5, 391: rura, id. 7, 823.
  2. B. Pharsālĭus, a, um, adj., Pharsalian: fuga, Cic. Phil. 2, 15, 39: pugna, in which Cœsar defeated Pompey, id. ib. 14, 8, 23 B. and K.; id. Div. 1, 32, 68; Plin. 8, 16, 21, § 53: terra, Liv. 33, 6, 11: tecta, Cat. 64, 37.
    As subst.: Pharsālĭa, ae, f., the region about Pharsalus, Cat. 64, 37; Ov. M. 15, 823; Tac. H. 1, 50 al.
    1. 2. An epic poem by Lucan, Luc. 7, 61; 9, 985.

Phărus or -os, i, f. (m., Suet. Claud. 20), = Φάρος.

  1. I. An island near Alexandria, in Egypt, where King Ptolemy Philadelphus built a famous light-house, hence called pharus, now Faro, Mel. 2, 7, 6; Auct. B. Alex. 19.
    1. B. Transf., of the lighthouse in the island of Pharos: Pharus est in insulā turris, magnā altitudine, mirificis operibus exstructa, quae nomen ab insulā accepit, Caes. B. C. 3, 112: superposuit turrem in exemplum Alexandrini Phari, Suet. Claud. 20; Juv. 6, 83; of other light-houses: pharon subiit, Val. Fl. 7, 84: turris phari terrae motu Capreis concidit, Suet. Tib. 74: Tyrrhena, Juv. 12, 76.
    2. C. Transf., poet., Egypt: regina Phari, Stat. S. 3, 2, 102: petimus Pharon arvaque Lagi, Luc. 8, 433.
      Hence,
      1. 1. Phărĭăcus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Pharus, Pharian, Egyptian (post-class.): sistra, App. M. 2, p. 127, 11.
      2. 2. Phărĭus, a, um, adj., = Φάριος, of or belonging to Pharus, Pharian; of the lighthouse: flammae, Luc. 9, 1004.
        Poet., transf., Egyptian: Pharia juvenca, i. e. Io, Ov. F. 5, 619; but Isis, Mart. 10, 48, 1; nence, turba, the priests of Isis, Tib. 1, 3, 32: conjux, i. e. Cleopatra, Mart. 4, 11, 4: dolores, the lamentations of the Egyptian women at the festival of Isis for the lost Osiris, Stat. S. 5, 3, 244: piscis, i. e. the crocodile, Ov. A. A. 3, 270: acetum, Juv. 13, 85.
        As subst.: Phărĭa, ae, f., Isis: SACRVM PHARIAE, Vet. Kalend. ap. Grut. 138.
      3. 3. Phărītae, ārum, m., the inhabitants of Pharos, Auct. B. Alex. 19.
  2. II. A small island on the coast of Dalmatia, formerly called Paros (Parus), now Lesina, Mel. 2, 7, 13.

phascōla appellant Graeci, quas vulgus peras vocat, Paul. ex Fest. p. 223 Mull. ( = τὰ φάσκωλα, a wallet, scrip).

Phase, n. indecl.,

  1. I. the Passover, a Jewish feast commemorative of the rescue of the first-born among the Jews from the destruction which visited the Egyptians: est enim Phase (id est transitus) Domini, Vulg. Exod. 12, 11: factum est Phase, id. 4 Reg. 23, 22.
  2. II. Transf., the sacrifice offered at the Passover, the paschal lamb: immolare, Vulg. 2 Par. 35, 11; id. Deut. 16, 2.

phăsēlārĭa (făsēl- and făcēl-), ium, n. [faselus], a dish of pickled French beans, Lampr. Elag. 20, 7.

Phăsēlis, ĭdis, f., = Φασηλίς.

  1. I. A town in Lycia, on the borders of Pamphylia, now Tekrova, Cic. Verr 2, 4, 10, § 21; Liv. 37, 23 init.
    Hence,
    1. B. Phăsēlītae, ārum, m., = Φασηλῖται, the inhabitants of Phaselis, the Phaselians (gen. Phaselitūm), Cic. Agr. 2, 19, 50.
  2. II. A city in Judea, with a neighboring valley abounding in palmtrees, Plin. 13, 4, 9, § 44; Luc. 8, 251.
    Hence,
    1. B. Phăsēlīnus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Phaselis, Plin. 23, 4, 49, § 95.

phăsēlus (phăsell- and făs-), i, m. and f., = φάσηλος.

  1. I. Lit., a kind of bean with an edible pod, French beans, kidney-beans, phasel (phaseolus vulgaris of Linn.): viciamque seres vilemque phaselum, Verg. G. 1, 227: longa fasellus, Col. 10, 377; v. id. 2, 10, 4; Pall. 10, 12.
  2. II. Transf., a light vessel (in the shape of a kidney-bean) made of wicker-work or papyrus, sometimes also of burned and painted clay (cf.: celox, lembus): epistulam de phaselo dare, Cic. Att. 1, 13, 1: phaselus ille quem videtis, Cat. 4, 1: phaselon solvere, Hor. C. 3, 2, 29: dare vela fictilibus phaselis, Juv. 15, 127: pictam phaselon, Mart. 10, 30, 13.

phăsĕŏlus (făsĕŏlus), i, m. dim. [phaselus, I.], a kind of bean with an edible pod, French beans, kidney-beans, phasel, Col. 11, 2, 72; 12, 9, 1; Plin. 24, 9, 40, § 65.

phăsgănĭon, i, n., = φασγάνιον, the sword-lily, gladiole (pure Lat. gladiolus), Plin. 25, 11, 88, § 137.

Phāsĭăcus, a, um, v. 1. Phasis, B.

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