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cŏëmptiōnālis (in MSS. also contracted cōmptiōnālis; cf. Lachm. ad Lucr. p. 135), e, adj. [coëmptio], pertaining to a sham sale or a sham marriage: senex, who was made use of in such a performance (cf. Cic. Mur. 12, 27); accordingly, poor, worthless, Plaut. Bacch. 4, 9, 52.
Of a low kind of slaves, Cur. ap. Cic. Fam. 7, 29, 1.

1. cōmo, mpsi (msi), mptum (mtum), 3, v. a. [co- (i. e. con) and emo; cf.: demo, promo].

  1. I. To bring together, form, frame, construct (Lucretian): dum perspicis omnem Naturam rerum quā constet compta figurā, Lucr. 1, 950 Munro ad loc.: nunc ea quo pacto inter sese mixta quibusque compta modis vigeant, id. 3, 259: quibus e rebus cum corpore compta vigeret (animi natura), Quove modo distracta rediret in ordia prima, id. 4, 27.
  2. II. To care for, take care of.
    1. A. Prop., in the class. per. usu. of the care of the hair, to comb, arrange, braid, dress; absol.: amica dum comit dumque se exornat, Plaut. Stich. 5, 4, 19: capillos, Cic. Pis. 11, 25; Verg. A. 10, 832: nitidum caput, Tib. 1, 8, 16: caput in gradus atque anulos, Quint. 12, 10, 47: comas acu, id. 2, 5, 12: comas hasta recurva, Ov. F. 2, 560: capillos dente secto, Mart. 12, 83.
      Transf. to the person: sacerdos Fronde super galeam et felici comptus olivā, wreathed, Verg. A. 7, 751: Tisiphone serpentibus undique compta, id. Cul. 218: pueri praecincti et compti, Hor. S. 2, 8, 70: longas compta puella comas, Ov. Am. 1, 1, 20.
    2. B. In partic., to adorn, deck, ornament: corpora si quis vulsa atque fucata muliebriter comat, Quint. 8, prooem. § 19: colla genasque, Stat. S. 1, 2, 110: vultus, Claud. in Eutr. 2, 337: vestes et cingula manu, id. VI. Cons. Hon. 525.
      1. 2. Transf. of things: vittā comptos praetendere ramos, Verg. A. 8, 128: colus compta, i. e. furnished or adorned with wool, Plin. 8, 48, 74, § 194.
  3. II. Trop., to deck, adorn: Cleopatra simulatum compta dolorem, Luc. 10, 83.
    Esp. freq. of rhet. ornament: non quia comi expolirique non debeat (oratio), Quint. 8, 3, 42; cf.: linguae orationisque comendae gratiā, Gell. 1, 9, 10.
    Hence, comptus (-mtus), a, um, P. a., adorned, ornamented, decked: juvenes ut femina compti, Ov. H. 4, 75: anima mundissima atque comptissima, Aug. Quant. Anim. 33.
    But usu. of discourse, embellished, elegant: compta et mitis oratio, Cic. Sen. 9, 28 (al. composita): comptior sermo, Tac. H. 1, 19: (Vinicius) comptae facundiae, id. A. 6, 15.
    Transf. to the person: Isocrates in diverso genere dicendi nitidus et comptus, Quint. 10, 1, 79.
    Adv.: comptē (comt-), with ornament, elegantly, only trop.: compte disserere, Sen. Ep. 75, 6: agere rem, Gell. 7, 3, 52.
    * Comp.: comptius dicere, Gell. 7, 3, 53.
    Sup., Plaut. Mil. 3, 3, 66, acc. to Ritschl (al. comissime).

com-păciscor (conp-) or -pĕcis-cor, pactus or pectus, 3, v. dep.,

  1. I. to make an agreement, form a compact with one (only in temp. perf. and partic., and rare): si sumus compecti, Plaut. Ps. 1, 5, 129: mecum matrimonio compecta sit, id. Cist. Fragm. Mai, p. 17, v. 11.
    Hence,
  2. II. P. a. as subst.: compactum (conp-) or compectum (conp-), i, n., an agreement, only in abl. sing.: compacto (compecto, Cic. Scaur. 5, 8 B. and K.), according to agreement or concert, in accordance with a previous compact, Afran. ap. Charis. p. 177 P.; Cic. Scaur. l. l.; id. Att. 10, 12, 2 Orell. N. cr.: conpecto, Liv. 5, 11, 7.
    In a similar sense: de conpecto, Plaut. Capt. 3, 1, 24; 3, 1, 29; id. Ps. 1, 5, 126; and: ex compacto, Suet. Caes. 20; Cod. Just. 7, 53, 3.

com-pāco, āre, v. a., to bring to peace (eccl. Lat.): Aegyptios, Cassiod. Hist. Eccl. 1, 20; 8, 13.

compactĭcĭus or -tĭus, a, um, = compactus, agreed upon: soter, Tert. adv. Val. 31.

compactĭlis, e, adj. [compactus, compingo].

  1. I. Pressed or joined together, compact: trabes, fitted one to another, Vitr. 4, 7: postes, id. 10, 14, 2: operimentum (of nuts), Plin. 15, 22, 24, § 88.
  2. II. Of form, thick-set, compact; of lions, Plin. 8, 16, 18, § 46; of bees, id. 11, 18, 19, § 59.

compactĭo, ōnis, f. [compingo].

  1. I. In abstr., a joining together: membrorum, Cic. Fin. 5, 11, 33.
  2. * II. In concr., the things that are joined together, a structure, frame, Vitr. 10, 15, 2 Schneid.

compactīvus, a, um, adj. [compingo], suitable for joining: gummi, Isid. Orig. 17, 7, 10.

compactum, i, n., v. compaciscor, II.

* compactūra, ae, f. [compingo], a joining together; only concr., a joint, Vitr. 4, 7, 4.

1. compactus, a, um, v. compingo.

2. compactus, a, um, v. compaciscor.

compaedăgōgīta, ae, m. (συμπαιδαγωγίτης), educated in the same pœdagogium; of slaves, Inscr. Orell. 2818 sq.

compaedăgōgĭus, ĭi, m., = compaedagogita, Inscr. Fabr. 361, 97.

compāgānus, i, m., an inhabitant of the same village, Inscr. Grut. 209, 1.

compāges, is (compāgo, ĭnis; nom., Stat. Th. 7, 43; acc. compaginem, Sen. Ep. 91, 12; abl. compagine, Ov. M. 1, 711; Cels. 4, 7; Manil. 1, 717; 1, 725; 1, 838), f. [root pag-; v. pango], a joining together, a connection, joint, structure (freq. and class.).

  1. I. Prop., Lucr. 6, 1070; Ov. M. 3, 30; Luc. 2, 487; 3, 491; Curt. 4, 3, 6; 4, 4, 12; Plin. 25, 3, 6, § 20; Suet. Aug. 43 et saep.
    Gen. plur. compagum, Plin. 2, 2, 2, § 5 Sillig.
  2. II. Trop.: in Veneris compagibus haerent, i. e. in the embraces, Lucr. 4, 1109; 4, 1201: dum sumus in his inclusi compagibus corporis, bodily structures, * Cic. Sen. 21, 77; cf. Vell. 2, 127, 3; Luc. 5, 119.
    So of the body of the state, Tac. H. 4, 74 fin.

compāgĭna, ae, f. [compago], a joining together, combination (peculiar to the agrimensores): litterarum, Baro ap. Goes. Agrim. p. 239, and Innoc. ib. pp. 245 and 246.

compāgĭnātĭo, ōnis, f., a joining, joint, = compages, junctura. ἁρμογή, Vet. Gloss.; Ambros. in. Psa. 37, § 29; Cassiod. in. Psa. 17, 6.

compāgĭno, āvi, ātum, 1, v. a. [compago].

  1. I. To join together (late Lat.), Amm. 21, 2, 1; 28, 2, 3; Prud. στεφ. 10, 889; Aug. Conf. 13, 30 al.
  2. II. Neutr., to border upon: compaginantes agri, Agrim. p. 346 Goes.

compāgo, ĭnis, v. compages.

com-pāgus, i, m., one belonging to the nearest village, Inscr. Orell. 3793.

* com-palpo, āre, v. a., to stroke, caress, Aug. Serm. Temp. 214.

com-par (conp-), păris, adj. (abl. compari, Liv. 36, 44, 7: compare, Ov. Am. 3, 5, 38; id. A. A. 3, 359; gen. plur. comparum, Plaut. Ps. 1, 1, 64), like or equal to another (poet.; after the Aug. per. also in prose).

  1. I. Adj.
          1. (α) With dat.: natura viri compar uxori, * Lucr. 4, 1251: consilium consilio, Liv. 28, 42, 20: milites militibus, centurionibus centuriones, tribuni tribunis compares, id. 8, 6, 15.
          2. (β) With gen.: eorum, Gell. 6 (7), 11, 1.
          3. (γ) Absol.: conubium, Liv. 1, 9, 5: postulatio Latinorum, id. 23, 6, 8: compari Marte concurrerat, id. 36, 44, 7.
  2. II. Subst. comm., an equal, a companion, comrade, colleague, Plaut. Ps. 4, 3, 9; * Hor. C. 2, 5, 2.
    1. B. Esp.
      1. 1. One beloved, a spouse, consort, mate, Plaut. Ps. 1, 1, 64; id. Cas. 4, 2, 18; * Cat. 68, 126; Ov. Am. 3, 5, 38; Inscr. Orell. 2656; so of the queen in chess, Ov. A. A. 3, 359.
      2. * 2. A figure of speech whereby several members of a period have an equal number of syllables, Auct. Her. 4, 20. 27.

compărābĭlis, e, adj. [1. comparo], that may be compared, comparable (very rare): species, Cic. Inv. 1, 28, 42; cf. id. ib. 1, 30, 47 and 49: mors trium virorum, Liv. 39, 52, 7.

compărātē adv., v. 1. comparo fin.

1. compărātĭcĭus, a, um, adj. [1. comparo], comparable, Tert. adv. Val. 13.

2. compărātĭcĭus, a, um, adj. [2. comparo], furnished by contribution: aurum, Cod. Th. 7, 6, 3.

1. compărātĭo (conp-), ōnis, f. [1. comparo], a comparing, comparison (in good prose).

  1. I. In gen.: comparationis duo sunt modi; unus cum idemne sit an aliquid intersit quaeritur: alter, cum quid praestet aliud alii quaeritur, Cic. de Or. 3, 29, 117; cf. id. ib. § 116: potest incidere saepe contentio et comparatio, de duobus honestis utrum honestius, id. Off. 1, 43, 152: majorum, minorum, parium, id. Top. 18, 71: orationis suae cum scriptis alienis, id. de Or. 1, 60, 257: rerum, Quint. 2, 4, 24: argumentorum, id. 5, 13, 57: in comparatione alicujus (post-Aug.): strata erant itinera vilioribus sarcinis, quas in conparatione meliorum avaritia contempserat, Curt. 3, 11, 20 Vogel ad loc.; so, ex conparatione regis novi, desiderium excitabatur amissi, id. 10, 8, 9; cf. Lact. 7, 15, 7.
  2. II. Esp.
    1. A. A trial of skill, contention: in comparationem se demittere, Suet. Rhet. 6.
    2. B. A relation, comparison: cum solis et lunae et quinque errantium ad eandem inter se comparationem est facta conversio, Cic. N. D. 2, 20, 51.
    3. C. Translation of the Gr. ἀναλογία, Cic. Univ. 4 fin.; 5; 7.
    4. * D. An agreement, contract (v. 1. comparo, II. B.): provincia sine sorte, sine comparatione, extra ordinem data, Liv. 6, 30, 3.
    5. E. Of animals, a coupling, pairing: boum, Col. 6, 2, 13.
  3. F. In rhet.: criminis, a defensive comparison of a crime with a good deed, on account of which the crime was committed, Cic. Inv. 1, 11, 15; 2, 24, 72; Auct. Her. 1, 14, 24; 1, 15, 25.
  4. G. In gram.
      1. 1. A climax, Don. p. 1745 P.
      2. 2. The comparative degree, Quint. 1, 5, 45.

2. compărātĭo, ōnis, f. [2. comparo].

  1. I. A preparing, providing for, preparation, etc. (rare, but in good prose): novi belli, Cic. Imp. Pomp. 4, 9; cf. pugnae, Auct. B. Afr. 35: veneni, Liv. 42, 17, 6: comparatio disciplinaque dicendi, Cic. Brut. 76, 263: novae amicitiae, Sen. Ep. 9, 6.
  2. II. A procuring, gaining, acquiring: testium, Cic. Mur. 21, 44: voluptatis, id. Fin. 2, 28, 92: criminis, i. e. of all the materials for an accusation, id. Clu. 67, 191: quibus ego ita credo, ut nihil de meā comparatione deminuam, id. Q. Fr. 1, 2, 5, § 16.
    Hence,
    1. B. In late Lat., a purchasing, purchase, Dig. 5, 1, 52; 41, 3, 41.

compărātīvē, adv., v. comparativus.

compărātīvus, a, um, adj. [1. comparo], of or pertaining to comparison, depending on comparison, comparative.

  1. I. In gen.: judicatio, Cic. Inv. 2, 25, 76 (cf. 1. comparatio, I.): genus causae (opp. simplex), Quint. 7, 4, 3: vocabulum, Gell. 5, 21, 13.
    Subst.: compărātīva, ōrum, n., words in the comparative degree, comparatives, Quint. 9, 3, 19.
    Adv.: compărā-tīvē, with comparison: dicere, Gell. 5, 21, 14; Ambros. de Fide, 5, 9, 71.
  2. II. Esp. in gram.
    1. A. Gradus, or absol., the comparative, Don. p. 1745 P. et saep.
    2. B. Casus, the ablative, Prisc. p. 671 P.

1. compărātor, ōris, m. [2. comparo], a purchaser (late Lat.), Paul. Sen. 2, 17, 15; Cod. Th. 10, 33, 1; Inscr. Orell. 4168.

2. compărātor, ōris, m. [1. comparo], a comparer: litterarum, Julian. Epit. Nov. c. 44, § 177.

* compăra-tus, ūs, m. [1. comparo], a relation, proportion (cf. 1. comparatio, II. B.): modulorum, Vitr. 7 praef. fin.

com-parco (conp-) or comperco (Sol. 22, 17), parsi or persi, 3, v. a., to save, husband well, lay up (ante- and post-class.).

  1. I. Prop.: quod ille compersit miser, Ter. Phorm. 1, 1, 10: cibum, Fronto, Laud. Neglig. 2, p. 371; Pacat. Pan. Theod. 32 fin.
  2. II. Trop., to abstain, forbear; with inf.: conperce, amabo, me attrectare, Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 137; cf. Paul. ex Fest. p. 60, 5 Müll.

com-pārĕo (conp-), ui, 2, v. n., to be perfectly evident or apparent, to appear, be visible (class.).

  1. I. Prop.: qui modo nusquam conparebas, nunc quom conpares peris, Plaut. Aul. 4, 4, 2: ita ego ad omnis conparebo tibi res benefactis frequens ( = in omnibus rebus), id. Mil. 3, 1, 68: nec tamen ulla Comparebat avis, * Lucr. 6, 1220: omnis suspitio in eos servos, qui non comparebant, commovebatur, Cic. Clu. 64, 180: repente comparuit incolumis, Suet. Aug. 14 et saep.: ornamenta orationis, Cic. Or. 71, 234; cf. Nep. Cato, 3, 4: nequaquam argenti ratio conparet, agrees, is correct, Plaut. Trin. 2, 4, 16; Cic. Sull. 26, 73 Orell. N. cr.
  2. II. Meton. (effectus pro causa), to be present, be in existence, to exist: et memor sum et diligens, ut quae imperes, conpareant, may be done, Plaut. Am. 2, 1, 83: signa et dona comparere omnia, Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 50, § 132: in Thucydide orbem modo orationis desidero, ornamenta comparent, id. Or. 71, 234: conquiri quae comparerent jussit, Liv. 6, 1, 10; so id. 25, 40, 4; 32, 10, 3; 34, 35, 6; cf. id. 26, 30, 10; 27, 24, 8; Ov. M. 6, 410.

com-părĭlis, e, adj., equal, like: figurae, Aus. Ecl. 2, 38: ratio, Arn. 2, p. 68.

1. compăro (conp-), āvi, ātum, 1, v. a. [compar], to couple together in the same relation, to connect in pairs, to pair, match, unite, join; constr. aliquid cum aliquā re, alicui rei, aliqua inter se, or absol.

  1. I. Lit. (rare but class.).
    1. A. In gen.: ut inter ignem et terram aquam deus animamque poneret, eaque inter se compararet et proportione conjungeret, ut, etc., Cic. Univ. 5 med.: comparari postremo, id. ib. 5: ambo cum simul aspicimus, non possumus non vereri, ne male comparati sitis, Liv. 40, 46, 4: L. Volumnius cum Ap. Claudio consul est factus, priore item consulatu inter se conparati, id. 10, 15, 12: labella cum labellis, Plaut. As. 3, 3, 78: quin meum senium cum dolore tuo conjungam et comparem, Att. ap. Non. p. 255, 31 (Trag. Rel. v. 90 Rib.).
      Hence,
    2. B. Esp. of combatants, for the usu. compono, to bring together to a contest, to match: ut ego cum patrono disertissimo comparer, Cic. Quint. 1, 2: cum Aesernino Samnite Pacideianus comparatus, id. Q. Fr. 3, 4, 2; Lucil. ap. Non. p. 257, 18: Scipio et Hannibal, velut ad supremum certamen comparati duces, Liv. 30, 28, 8: hunc Threci comparavit, Suet. Calig. 35.
  2. II. Trop.
    1. A. To couple together in judgment.
      1. 1. To count one object fully equal to another, to place on the same footing, put on an equality with (rare but class.): neminem tibi profecto hominem ex omnibus aut anteposuissem umquam aut etiam comparassem, Cic. Fragm. ap. Non. p. 256, 4; cf. Nep. Iphic. 1, 1; Liv. 28, 28, 15; Quint. 10, 1, 98; Cat. 61, 65 al.: cum quibus (hominibus) comparari sordidum, Cic. Rep. 1, 5, 9; so id. Fam. 12, 30, 7: et se mihi comparat Ajax? Ov. M. 13, 338.
      2. 2. In gen., to place together in comparison, to compare (the usu. signif. of the word in prose and poetry): homo quod rationis est particeps similitudines comparat, Cic. Off. 1, 4, 11: majora, minora, paria, id. de Or. 2, 40, 172; id. Top. 18, 68: metaphora rei comparatur, quam volumus exprimere, Quint. 8, 6, 8.
        With dat.: equi fortis et victoris senectuti, comparat suam, Cic. Sen. 5, 14: si regiae stirpi comparetur ignobilis, Curt. 8, 4, 25: restat ut copiae copiis conparentur vel numero vel, etc., Liv. 9, 19, 1: se majori pauperiorum turbae, Hor. S. 1, 1, 112: Periclem fulminibus et caelesti fragori comparat, Quint. 12, 10, 24; cf. id. 12, 10, 65: necesse est sibi nimium tribuat, qui se nemini comparat, id. 1, 2, 18: nec tantum inutilibus comparantur utilia, sed inter se quoque ipsa, id. 3, 8, 33; cf id. 3, 6, 87.
        With cum and abl.: hominem cum homine et tempus cum tempore et rem cum re, Cic. Dom. 51, 130; id. Verr. 2, 4, 54, § 121: cum illoceteris rebus nullo modo comparandus es, id. Phil. 2, 46, 117: cum meum factum cum tuo comparo, id. Fam. 3, 6, 1; id. Off. 3, 1, 2; 2, 6, 20: corporis commoda cum externis et ipsa inter se corporis, id. ib. 2, 25, 88: longiorem orationem cum magnitudine utilitatis, id. ib. 2, 6, 20: victoria, quae cum Marathonio possit comparari tropaeo, Nep. Them. 5, 3: totam causam nostram cum tota adversarii causā, Quint. 7, 2, 22; 12, 7, 3.
        With ad: nec comparandus hic quidem ad illum est, Ter. Eun. 4, 4, 14: sed nihil comparandi causā loquar, I will institute no comparison, Cic. Pis. 1, 3.
        Hence,
      3. 3. With rel.-clause, to reflect, consider, judge; or to prove, show, by comparing (rare): id ego semper mecum sic agito et comparo, quo pacto magnam molem minuam, Att. ap. Non. p. 256, 20: cum comparetur, utrum, etc., Auct. Her. 2, 28, 45: comparando quam intestina corporis seditio similis esset irae plebis in patres, etc., Liv. 2, 32, 12; cf. Tac. A. 3, 5: deinde comparat, quanto plures deleti sint homines, etc., Cic. Off. 2, 5, 16.
    2. B. Comparare inter se, t. t., of colleagues in office, to agree together in respect to the division of duties, to come to an agreement (freq. in Liv., esp. of the consuls, who made an arrangement between themselves in respect to their provinces): inter se decemviri comparabant, quos ire ad bellum, quos praeesse exercitibus oporteret, Liv. 3, 41, 7: senatusconsultum factum est, ut consules inter se provincias Italiam et Macedoniam compararent sortirenturve, id. 42, 31, 1; 8, 20, 3; 32, 8, 1; 33, 43, 2; 26, 8, 8; 41, 6, 1: (consules) comparant inter se ut, etc., id. 8, 6, 13; 10, 15, 12: ut consules sortirentur conparerentve inter se, uter, etc., id. 24, 10, 2; of the tribunes of the people, id. 29, 20, 9; of the proprætors, id. 40, 47, 1.
    3. C. (In acc. with I. B.) Si scias quod donum huic dono contra comparet, opposes to this, Ter. Eun. 2, 3, 63.
      Hence, * compărātē, adv., in or by comparison, comparatively: quaerere (opp. simpliciter), Cic. Top. 22, 84.

2. com-păro (conp-), āvi, ātum, 1 (old form conparassit = comparaverit, Plaut. Ep. 1, 2, 19), v. a.

  1. I. To prepare something with zeal, care, etc., to make ready, to set in order, furnish, provide, etc. (class.)
    1. A. Lit.: magnifice et ornate convivium comparat (al. apparat), Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 26, § 65; Tib. 1, 10, 42: sibi remedium ad magnitudinem frigorum, Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 10, § 26: se, to make one’s self ready, to prepare one’s self, id. Mil. 10, 28: se ad respondendum, id. N. D. 3, 8, 19: se ad iter, Liv. 28, 33, 1; cf. pass., id. 42, 43, 4: se ad omnis casus, Caes. B. G. 7, 79: insidias alicui per aliquem, Cic. Clu. 16, 47; cf.: dolum ad capiendos eos, Liv. 23, 35, 2: comparare et constituere accusationem, Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 1, § 2; cf.: comparare accusatorem filio suo, id. Clu. 67, 191: fugam, Caes. B. G. 4, 18: domicilium ibi, Liv. 1, 34, 10: iter ad regem, Nep. Alcib. 10, 3 et saep.: vultum e vultu, to adjust according to, to fashion, Plaut. Am. 3, 3, 5.
      In the histt. freq. of preparations for war: bellum, Nep. Dion, 5, 1; id. Ages. 2, 4; id. Eum. 7, 1; Liv. 9, 29, 5; 32, 28, 7; Cic. Phil. 3, 1, 1 et saep.: arma, milites, classem, Liv. 42, 30, 11; cf. Nep. Milt. 4, 1; id. Dion, 4, 3; id. Dat. 4, 1 and 4; id. Hann. 3, 2; Liv. 28, 13, 1; 35, 26, 1; Suet. Tib. 25; Curt. 4, 9, 3; cf.: arma latroni, Quint. 12, 1, 1.
      Pass. in mid. force: ita fiet ut isdem locis et ad suadendum et ad dissuadendum simus conparati, Auct. Her. 3, 3, 4: ab hoc colloquio legati Romani in Boeotiam conparati sunt, made ready to go, Liv. 42, 43, 4.
          1. (β) Absol.: ex hac parte diligentissime comparatur, Cic. Fam. 16, 11, 3: tempore ad comparandum dato, Nep. Thras. 2, 2; so Liv. 35, 45, 5; 38, 12, 7.
          2. (γ) With inf.: urere tecta, Ov. Tr. 2, 267: an ita me comparem, Non perpeti, etc., place myself in a condition, Ter. Eun. 1, 1, 2.
    2. B. Trop. of the arrangements of nature, of civil life, of manners, customs, etc., to arrange, appoint, ordain, establish; esp. in the pass. impers.: ita quoique est in aetate hominum conparatum, Plaut. Am. 2, 2, 5; cf. Ter. Heaut. 3, 1, 94 Fleck.; Liv. 3, 68, 10: more majorum comparatum est, Cic. Rosc. Am. 53, 153; cf.: ita comparatum more majorum erat, ne, etc., Liv. 39, 29, 5: est ita natura comparatum ut, etc., Plin. Ep. 5, 19, 5: praetores, ut considerate fieret, comparaverunt, Cic. Quint. 16, 51; so Auct. Her. 4, 16, 23; Ter. Phorm. 1, 1, 7: jam hoc prope iniquissime comparatum est, quod in morbis, etc., Cic. Clu. 21, 57: eis utendum censeo quae legibus conparata sunt, Sall. C. 51, 8.
      So rarely of persons: sic fuimus semper comparati, ut, etc., Cic. de Or. 3, 9, 32.
  2. II. To procure what one does not yet possess or what is not yet in existence, to procure, get, purchase, obtain, prepare, make, collect.
    1. A. Prop.: negoti sibi qui volet vim parare, Navem et mulierem haec duo conparato, Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 2: mihi quadraginta minas, id. Ep. 1, 2, 19: aurum ac vestem atque alia, quae opus sunt, Ter. Heaut. 4, 8, 15: pecudes carius, Suet. Calig. 27: merces, Dig. 13, 4, 2 fin.: ex incommodis Alterius sua ut comparent commoda, Ter. And. 4, 1, 4; so id. Heaut. 2, 4, 17: Sthenius ab adulescentio paulo studiosius haec compararat, supellectilem, etc., Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 34, § 83; Curt. 5, 6, 3: gemmas, toreumata, signa, tabulas, Suet. Caes. 47: victum et cultum humanum labore et industriā, Cic. Oecon. ap. Col. 12, praef. § 2: Suet. Calig. 22.
      1. 2. Of abstract things: amicitias, Cic. Inv. 1, 1, 1; cf. id. Fin. 1, 20, 65: auctoritatem sibi, Caes. B. G. 5, 53: laudes artibus, Cic. Fam. 2, 4, 2; id. Off. 2, 13, 45: tribunicium auxilium sibi, Liv. 9, 34, 3 al.; Hor. Epod. 2, 30.
    2. B. Trop.: sex (tribunos) ad intercessionem comparavere, brought or gained them over to their side, Liv. 4, 48, 11.

com-partĭceps, tĭcĭpis, adj., partaking, participants together (late Lat.): promissionis, Vulg. Eph. 3, 6; Hier. in Eph. 3, 5 sqq.

com-partĭor, īri, v. dep., to divide something with one, to share: MVNERA CVM ALIQVO, Inscr. Orell. 4040: intellectum prudentiae sapientia compartietur, Vulg. Ecclus. 1, 24.
Pass.: compartiri altario, to be made partaker of, Aug. 2 Serm. Dom. 54.

com-partŭrĭo, īre, 4, v. n., to be associated in childbirth with any one, Ambros. Hexaem. 4, 8, 31; id. de Fide, 1, 14, 87.

com-pasco (con-), no perf., pastum, ĕre, v. n. and a.

  1. I. To feed together, feed in common: si compascuus ager est, jus est compascere, Cic. Top. 3, 12; Dig. 8, 5, 20.
  2. II. To feed, pasture, in gen.: Brundisiana (ostrea), Plin. 32, 6, 21, § 61.
    1. B. Pregn.
      1. 1. To consume by feeding, to eat: pabulum, Varr. R. R. 2, prooem. § 5; so in pass., id. ib. 1, 53.
      2. 2. To drive away, destroy by feeding: famem, Plin. 9, 54, 79, § 169.

com-pascŭus, a, um, adj., of or pertaining to common pasturage: ager, a common pasture, Cic. Top. 3, 12; Lex Thor.; Inscr. Orell. 3121; cf. Paul. ex Fest. p. 40, 1 Müll.: jus compascui, Dig. 8, 5, 20; cf. Quint. 5, 10, 85.

* compassĭbĭlis, e, adj. [compatior], suffering with one, Tert. adv. Prax. 29.

compassĭo, ōnis, f. [compatior], fellow-suffering, fellow-feeling (eccl. Lat.), Tert. Res Carn. 4: sententiarum, sympathy, agreement, id. ib. 3 fin.

* com-pastor, ōris, m., a fellow-herdsman, Hyg. Fab. 187.

compastus, a, um, Part., from compasco.

com-pătĭor, passus, 3, v. dep. (late Lat.).

  1. I. To suffer with one, Tert. adv. Prax. 29; Cael. Aur. Acut. 2, 16, 98.
  2. II. To have compassion, to feel pity, Aug. Ep. 40, 29, 6; id. Conf. 3, 2.

com-patrĭōta, ae, m., a fellow-citizen, συμπολίτης, Gloss. Gr. Lat.

com-pā̆trōnus, i, m., a fellow-patron (Lat. of jurists), Dig. 26, 4, 3, § 4 sq.; 38, 5, 1.

com-pauper, ĕris, m., a companion in poverty, fellow-pauper (late Lat.), Aug. Serm. 25 ex 50 homil. c. 3.

com-păvesco, ĕre, v. inch. n., to be thoroughly terrified, to be very much afraid: animus, Gell. 1, 23, 9; cf. Macr. S. 1, 6, 22.

compăvĭo, īre, v. a.; only in perf. part. pass.: compăvītus, a, um, beaten, App. M. 7, p. 197, 24 (al. aliter).

compeccātor, ōris, m., a fellow-sinner, Hier. Ep. 112, 5.

com-pecco, āre, v. n., to err or commit a fault together (late Lat.), Cael. Aur. Acut. 2, 12; id. Tard. 3, 1 fin.

compĕciscor, v. compaciscor.

compectum and compectus, a, um, v. compaciscor.

compĕdes, um, v. compes.

compĕdĭo (conp-), no perf., ĭtum, 4, v. a. [compes], to fetter, shackle (mostly anteand post-class.).

  1. I. Prop.: pedes corrigiis, Varr. ap. Non. p. 28, 9: servi conpediti, Cato, R. R. 56; Plaut. Capt. 5, 1, 24; Sen. Tranq. 10, 1; Dig. 4, 3, 7, § 7 al.
  2. * II. Trop.: rebus immortalibus perniciosissime compediri, Aug. Ep. 39.

compĕdus, a, um, adj. [compes], fettering, shackling: linea (i. e. compes), Varr. ap. Non. p. 28, 9, and p. 451, 25.

compellātĭo, ōnis, f. [2. compello].

  1. I. In gen., an accosting, Auct. Her. 4, 15, 22.
  2. II. Esp. with reproach, a reprimand, reproof, rebuke (rare), Cic. Phil. 3, 7, 17; in plur., id. Fam. 12, 25, 2; Gell. 1, 5, 2.

1. com-pello (conp-), pŭli, pulsum, 3, v. a., to drive together to a place, to collect, assemble (opp. expello, Cic. Pis. 7, 16; to dispellere, Plaut. As. 3, 3, 149; and to aspellere, id. Trin. 3, 2, 46; class.).

  1. I. Lit. of herds, flocks: tum compellendum (agnos) in gregem ovium, Varr. R. R. 2, 2, 18: armentum in speluncam, Liv. 1, 7, 5; cf.: pecoris vim ingentem in saltum avium, id. 9, 31, 7: greges in unum, Verg. E. 7, 2: pecus totius provinciae, Cic. Pis. 36, 87: haedorum gregem hibisco (poet. for ad hibiscum), Verg. E. 2, 30.
    Also of other objects: primordia, Lucr. 2, 564: homines unum in locum, Cic. Inv. 1, 2, 2: naves (hostium) in portum, Caes. B. C. 1, 58 fin.: hostes intra oppida murosque, id. B. G. 7, 65; so of the driving or forcing of enemies in a body; cf.: adversarios intra moenia, Nep. Ages. 5, 3: hostem fugatum in naves, Liv. 10, 2, 2: Dardanos in urbem, id. 41, 19, 9; Suet. Vit. 15: oppidanos intra munimenta, Curt. 8, 11, 1: hostes in fugam, Just. 4, 4.
    Hence fig.: bellum Medulliam, to turn the war thither, Liv. 1, 33, 4: is (hostes) eo compulit ut locorum angustiis clausi, etc., drove them into so close corners, Nep. Ham. 2, 4: Pompeium domum suam, Cic. Pis. 7, 16: ad monumentorum deversoria plebe compulsā, Suet. Ner. 38: quam (imaginem) virga semel horridaNigro compulerit gregi, * Hor. C. 1, 24, 18: ossa in suas sedes, Cels. 6, 7 fin.
  2. II. Trop.
    1. A. To bring or press together: amores nostros dispulsos, Plaut. As. 3, 3, 149: cur eam tantas in angustias et in Stoicorum dumeta compellimus? Cic. Ac. 2, 35, 112.
      Far more freq.,
    2. B. To drive, bring, move, impel, incite, urge, compel, force, constrain to something; constr. with ad, in, more rarely with ut, the inf. or absol.
          1. (α) With ad (freq. in Suet.): aliquem ad virtutem, Plaut. Bacch. 4, 10, 10: ad arma, Cic. Marcell. 5, 13: ad bellum, Ov. M. 5, 219: ad deditionem fame, Suet. Aug. 14; Curt. 9, 1, 19: ad necem, Suet. Aug. 66; id. Calig. 23; id. Ner. 35: ad mortem, id. Tib. 56; Quint. 7, 3, 7: ad confessionem, Suet. Claud. 15: ad pugnam, id. ib. 21: ad rapinas, Luc. 7, 99: ad defectionem, Curt. 10, 1, 45: ad laqueum, Plin. 36, 5, 4, § 12: ad impudicitiam, Dig. 1, 6, 2.
          2. (β) With in: in hunc sensum compellor injuriis, Cic. Fam. 1, 9, 21: in eundem metum, Liv. 25, 29, 8: in socordiam, Col. 11, 1, 11: in mortem, Quint. 7, 3, 7: in metum, Tac. H. 2, 27.
          3. (γ) With ut: callidum senem callidis dolis Conpuli et perpuli, mihi omnia ut crederet, Plaut. Bacch. 4, 4, 4; Suet. Caes. 1; 24; id. Vesp. 2; Tac. Or. 4; Curt. 8, 8, 2.
          4. (δ) With inf.: aliquem jussa nefanda pati, Ov. F. 3, 860; Luc. 3, 144; Suet. Tib. 62; id. Dom. 14; Curt. 5, 1, 35; Just. 16, 5; 30, 3; Gai Inst. 2, 237.
            (ε) Absol.: ceteras nationes conterruit, compulit, domuit, Cic. Prov. Cons. 13, 33: aliquā indignatione compellendus, Quint. 9, 4, 138: ille qui aspellit, is conpellit, Plaut. Trin. 3, 2, 46; freq. in perf. part.: periculis compulsus, Cic. Fam. 1, 9, 11; Caes. B. C. 3, 41; Liv. 27, 30, 3.

2. compello (conp-), āvi, ātum, 1, v. a. [1. compello; cf. 2. appello, āre, from 1. appello, ĕre, and jugare, from root of jungo], to accost one.

  1. I. Without implying reproach, to accost, address (mostly poet.): exin compellare pater me voce videtur his verbis, etc., Enn. ap. Cic. Div. 1, 20, 41 (Ann. v. 45 Vahl.); so, aliquem, id. ap. Gell. 12, 4, 4 (Ann. v. 256 ib.): aliquem voce, Verg. A. 5, 161; and: notis vocibus, id. ib. 6, 499; cf. Ov. M. 14, 839: blande hominem, Plaut. Poen. 3, 3, 72; cf. id. Stich. 2, 1, 43: familiariter, id. Men. 2, 3, 23: carmine, * Cat. 64, 24: talibus agrestem com pellat Oreada dictis, Ov. M. 8, 787; 12, 585: Tauream nomine, Liv. 23, 47, 2; Curt. 4, 13, 20: aliquem multo honore, Verg. A. 3, 474: verbis amicis, id. ib. 2, 372: aliquam de stupro, to invite to unchastity, Val. Max. 6, 1, 2; in like sense absol.: compellare, Hyg. Fab. 57.
  2. II. In a hostile sense, to address one reproachfully or abusively, to reproach, chide, rebuke, upbraid, abuse, to take to task, call to account (good prose).
    1. A. In gen.: mimus nominatim Accium poëtam compellavit in scaenā, Auct. Her. 1, 14, 24: neque aspexit mater, quin eum fratricidam impiumque detestans compellaret, Nep. Timol. 1, 5: pro cunctatore segnem, pro cauto timidum compellabat, Liv. 22, 12, 12; 34, 2, 8: ne compellarer inultus, Hor. S. 2, 3, 297; 1, 7, 31; id. Ep. 1, 7, 34.
    2. B. Esp., jurid. t. t., of authorities, to summon one to answer a charge; or of adversaries, to arraign one before a tribunal, to accuse of crime (cf. 2. appello): Q. Ciceronem compellat edicto, Cic. Phil. 3, 7, 17; id. Red. in Sen. 5, 12; 13, 52: Nigidius minari in contione, se judicem, qui non adfuerit, compellaturum, id. Att. 2, 2, 3; so id. Phil. 3, 7, 17; Cael. ap. Cic. Fam. 8, 12, 3; Nep. Alcib. 4, 1; Liv. 43, 2, 11; Tac. A. 16, 27; Suet. Caes. 17.

compendĭārĭus, a, um, adj. [compendium],

  1. I. short, compendious, only a few times of ways or roads: via ad gloriam proxima et quasi compendiaria, * Cic. Off. 2, 12, 43; cf. Val. Max. 7, 2, ext. 1.
  2. II. Subst.
    1. A. compendĭārĭa, ae, f. (sc. via), a short way or method; fig., Varr. ap. Non. p. 202, 5; Petr. 2, 9; Sen. Ep. 119, 1; cf. id. ib. 27, 5: breviores etiamnum quaedam picturae compendiariae, Plin. 35, 10, 36, § 110.
    2. B. compendĭārĭum, ii, n. (sc. iter), the same, Sen. Ep. 73, 11.

compendĭfăcio, ĕre, v. compendium.

compendĭo, āvi, ātum, 1, v. a. [compendium] (eccl. Lat.).

  1. I. To shorten, abridge: sermonem, Tert. adv. Marc. 4, 9; 4, 1.
  2. II. Compendiare alicui, lit., to shorten the way of life for one; hence, to kill him, Aug. Quaest. in Hept. 7 fin.

compendĭōsē, adv., v. compendiosus fin.

compendĭōsus, a, um, adj. [compendium].

  1. I. Advantageous (opp. damnosus), Col. 1, 4, 5.
  2. II. Abridged, short, brief, compendious (post-class.): verba, App. M. 11, p. 268, 12: iter, id. ib. 6, p. 186, 12: exitus citae mortis, Prud. στεφ. 2, 334.
    Adv.: compendĭōsē, compendiously, briefly, Cassiod. Var. 8, 29.
    In comp., Sid. Ep. 7, 10.

compendĭum, ii, n. [compendo], orig. belonging to the lang. of econ., that which is weighed together, kept together, saved (cf. Varr. L. L. 5, § 183 Müll.; Paul. ex Fest. p. 72, 10 Müll.); a saving or gain, profit acquired by saving (opp. dispendium; class. in prose and poetry).

  1. I. Prop.: ego hodie compendi feci binos panes in dies, have saved two loaves, Plaut. Pers. 4, 3, 2; cf. id. Truc. 2, 4, 26: aliquem mercibus suppeditandis cum quaestu compendioque dimittere, Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 3, § 6; 2, 3, 46, § 109: turpe compendium effugere, id. Fl. 3, 7: se negat facturum compendii sui causā quod non liceat, id. Off. 3, 15, 63: homines ad turpe compendium commovere, Auct. Her. 4, 40, 52: servire privato compendio suo, Caes. B. C. 3, 32; id. B. G. 7, 43; Liv. 8, 36, 10; Plin. 21, 12, 41, § 70; Suet. Tib. 48: compendia repetere ignotis terris, Tib. 1, 3, 39 al.: ligni, Plin. 23, 7, 64, § 127; cf. operae, id. 17, 23, 35, § 214; 18, 20, 49, § 181: viae, id. 5, 5, 5, § 38.
    1. B. Esp.,
      1. 1. Shortness of way, a short way ( = compendiaria), Quint. 4, 2, 46; Tac. A. 12, 28; Flor. 3, 3, 7; Just. 2, 10 fin.; cf. montis, a short cut across the mountain, Ov. M. 3, 234: maris, Tac. A. 2, 55: fugae, Sil. 12, 533; cf. Plin. Pan. 95, 5; Gell. praef. § 12.
      2. 2. In the phrases,
        1. a. Facere compendium, to make a profit, gain.
          1. (α) In gen.: compendium edepol haud aetati optabile Fecisti, quom istanc nactu’s impudentiam, Plaut. Bacch. 1, 2, 51.
          2. (β) More freq. to make a saving, i. e. be sparing of a thing: compendium ego te facere pultandi volo, to save your knocking, i. e. to cease therefrom, id. Ps. 2, 2, 11: errationis, id. Rud. 1, 2, 90: praeconis, id. Stich. 1, 3, 38.
        2. b. Aliquid ponere ad compendium. to save, spare something, i. e. not to say it, Plaut. Cas. 3, 1, 3; 3, 1, 5; cf.: coaddito ad compendium, id. ib. v. 4.
  2. II. A sparing, saving in any thing done, i. e. a shortening, abbreviating: quam potes, tam verba confer maxume ad compendium, i. e. be concise, brief, Plaut. Mil. 3, 1, 184.
    So of discourse, etc. (ante-class.): facere or fieri compendi, to shorten, abridge (the discourse), or to be shortened, abridged: lamentas fletus facere conpendi licet, Pac. ap. Non. p. 132, 29 (Trag. Rel. v. 175 Rib.): compendi verba multa jam faciam tibi, will be very brief with you, Plaut. Bacch. 2, 2, 7; id. Most. 1, 1, 57; id. Ps. 4, 7, 42: verbis velitationem fieri compendi volo, in few words, briefly, id. As. 2, 2, 41; cf.: sed jam fieri dictis compendium volo, id. Capt. 5, 2, 12: in ipsis statim elementis etiam brevia docendi monstrare compendia, Quint. 1, 1, 24; cf. id. 1, 1, 30; and: compendio morari, i. e. only a short time, id. 1, 4, 22.

* com-pendo, ĕre, v. a., to weigh, balance together: compendium, quod, cum compenditur, una fit, Varr. L. L. 5, § 183 Müll.

compensātĭo (conp-), ōnis, f. [compenso], a weighing, balancing of several things together.

  1. I. Prop., in the lang. of business, a balancing of accounts, a rendering of an equivalent, equalizing: compensatio est debiti et crediti inter se distributio, Dig. 16, 2, 1; so ib. 24, 3, 15; Gai Inst. 4, 66 sq.: mercium, an exchange, barter (opp. pecunia), Just. 3, 2, 11.
  2. II. Trop (only in Cic.): hac usurum conpensatione sapientem, ut voluptatem fugiat, si ea majorem doiorem effectura sit, Cic. Tusc. 5, 33, 95: incommoda commodorum conpensatione lenire, id. N. D. 1, 9, 23.

compensātīvus, a, um, adj. [compenso], serving for compensating (late Lat.), Victor. Rhet. 1, p. 137; 2, p. 217.

compensātō, adv., v. compenso fin.

com-penso (conp-), āvi, ātum, 1, v. a., to poise, weigh several things with one another; hence, in the lang. of business, to equalize one thing with another by weighing, to balance with one another, to make good, compensate, balance against, lit. and trop. (class. in prose and poetry; most freq. in Cic.); constr. aliquid cum aliquā re, aliquā re, or absol.

  1. I. In gen.
          1. (α) Cum aliquā re: nonne compensabit cum uno versiculo tot mea volumina laudum suarum, Cic. Pis. 30, 75: laetitiam cum doloribus, id. Fin. 2, 30, 97: bona cum vitiis, Hor. S. 1, 3, 70.
          2. (β) Aliquā re: summi labores nostri magnā compensati gloriā, Cic. de Or. 3, 4, 14; id. Font. 5, 13 (1, 3): damna ab aliquo aetatis fructu compensata, id. Verr. 2, 5, 13, § 33: o vix ullo otio compensandam hanc rei publicae turpitudinem, id. Att. 7, 18, 2; id. Or. 69, 231: paucitatem pedum gravitatis suae (sc. spondei) tarditate, id. ib. 64, 216: tot amissis te unum, Ov. H. 3, 51: pecuniam pedibus, to make up for the low price in shoe-leather, Cato ap. Cic. Fl. 29, 72: facinora ministerio, Curt. 10, 1, 2: reprehendens aliā laude compenses, * Quint. 11, 1, 87.
  2. II. In post-Aug. poets, of a way, to shorten, spare, save: longum iter, Sen. Hippol. 83 (cf. pensare iter, Luc. 9, 685).
    Hence, compensātō, adv., with compensation or reward, Tert. Pall. 2 (al. leg. compensati).

comperco, v. comparco.

* com-pĕrē̆grīnus, i, m., a fellowstranger, Sid. Ep. 7, 17 fin.

compĕrendĭnātĭo, ōnis, f. [comperendino],

  1. I. a deferring of the time (of trial) to the third day or later (post-Aug.), Sen. Ep. 97, 5; Plin. Ep. 5, 21, 1; 6, 2, 6; Gell. 14, 2, 1; Tac. Or. 38; cf. Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 9, § 26.
  2. II. Transf., in gen., delay: sine ullā comperendinatione, Ambros. in Luc. 1, 8.

compĕrendĭnātus, ūs, m. [comperendino], i. q. comperendinatio, q. v., Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 9, § 26; id. Brut. 22, 87.

compĕrendĭno, āvi, ātum, 1, v. a. [comperendinus], jurid. t. t.; prop. of the judge,

  1. I. to cite a defendant to a new time of trial, appointed on the third following day or later: reum, Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 9, § 26; 2, 1, 7, § 20.
  2. II. Meton., of the party which demands the deferring: ut ante primos ludos comperendinem, Cic. Verr. 1, 11, 34 Klotz ad loc.

com-pĕrendĭnus, a, um, adj.: dies, the third following day to which a trial was deferred, Gai Inst. 4, 15; Macr. S. 1, 16, 3; 1, 16, 14.

com-pĕrĕo, ĭi, īre, to perish together, acc. to Diom. 1, p. 369 P.

com-pĕrĭo, pĕri, pertum, 4, v. a. [root par-, of paro, pario; cf. 2. comparo, and aperio, operio, etc.; by others separated from these words and referred to root per-, of πειράω, peritus, periculum; but cf. Corss. Ausspr. II. 410], lit., to disclose wholly, lay open (a fact), without the access. idea of communicating the thing disclosed (which aperio expresses; v. aperio); to obtain a knowledge of a thing, to find out with certainty, to have or gain certain information, to ascertain, learn, etc. (class. in prose and poetry): certo comperi, Ter. Eun. 5, 1, 9: cum indicia mortis se comperisse manifesto et manu tenere diceret, Cic. Brut. 80, 277: hoc, Nep. Eum. 8, 4: stellarum ortus, Cat. 66, 2: de amore hoc comperit, Ter. And. 1, 3, 6: nihil de hoc (Sullā) consul comperi, Cic. Sull. 31, 86; Sall. J. 68, 1: postquam de scelere filii comperit, Nep. Paus. 5, 3; Suet. Dom. 6 al.
With inf. and acc., Ter. And. 1, 1, 63: posteaquam comperit eum posse vivere, Cic. Rosc. Am. 12, 33: hanc gentem Clusium inde venisse comperio, Liv. 5, 35, 3; Quint. 1, 7, 24: diram qui contudit hydram, comperit invidiam supremo fine domari, * Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 12: ubi comperi ex eis qui, etc., Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 69: aliquid ex multis, Cic. Clu. 68, 192: ex litteris, Nep. Paus. 4, 5: per exploratores, Caes. B. G. 4, 19; 6, 28; Nep. Alcib. 8, 6: certis auctoribus, Cic. Att. 14, 8, 1: nihil testibus, nihil tabulis, nihil aliquo gravi argumento, id. Clu. 45, 126; Caes. B. C. 2, 37: a quo ut rem gestam comperit, Nep. Dat. 3, 4: quae ex fratre compererat nuntiari regi jubet, Curt. 6, 7, 18: ut postea ex captivis comperit, Caes. B. G. 1, 22; Hirt. B. G. 8, 17; 8, 36.
Cicero, on account of the frequent repetition of the phrase omnia comperi, in the trial of Catiline, was often bantered by his contemporaries; hence: (Clodius) me tantum comperisse omnia criminabatur, Cic. Att. 1, 14, 5; cf. id. Fam. 5, 5, 2.
With depend. question: dolo an vere cunctatus, parum comperimus, Sall. J. 113, 1; 67, 3.

        1. (β) Esp. freq. in part. perf. pass.: Oppianici facinus manifesto compertum atque deprehensum, Cic. Clu. 14, 43: non ego haec incertis jacta rumoribus adfero ad vos, sed comperta et explorata, Liv. 42, 13, 1; cf. id. 29, 18, 7; 29, 21, 13: sintne haec investigata, comperta, patefacta per me, Quint. 9, 3, 49: pecuniam ex aerario scribae viatoresque aedilicii clam egessisse per indicem comperti, discovered, Liv. 30, 39, 7: compertus adulterare matronas, Suet. Aug. 67: uxorem in stupro generi compertam, detected, id. Tib. 35.
          Also with the gen. of the crime: compertus stupri, Liv. 22, 57, 2; Just. 11, 11, 5: probri, Liv. 7, 4, 4: sacrilegii, id. 32, 1, 8: flagitii, Tac. A. 1, 3; 4, 11: de his haud facile compertum narraverim, give certain information, Sall. J. 17, 2: qui ex fratre comperta ipsi nuntiasset, Curt. 6, 8, 11: haec ex vate comperta nuntiabat, id. 7, 7, 22.
          In abl. absol.: comperto lege Gabiniā Bithyniam et Pontum consuli datam, Sall. H. Fragm. ap. Prisc. p. 1130 P.; so Liv. 31, 39, 4 and 7; 33, 5, 4; Tac. A. 1, 66; 4, 36; 11, 13 fin.; 14, 57.
          So, also, compertum habeo and compertum mihi est, I know full well: quod de his duobus habuerint compertum, Cic. Clu. 45, 127; so Sall. C. 2, 2; 22 fin.: pro comperto polliceri, as certain, Suet. Ner. 31.
          Hence, compertē, adv., on good authority; only Gell. 1, 22, 9; and in comp., id. 1, 11, 12.

compĕrĭor (conp-), īri, pertus sum, 4, v. dep., collat. form of comperio, q. v., to ascertain, learn, obtain certain knowledge that, etc. (rare); constr. mostly with acc. and inf.: dum ne ab hoc me falli comperiar, Ter. And. 5, 3, 31; Sall. J. 45, 1; 108, 3; Tac. A. 4, 20; Gell. 3, 3, 1: quid comperior? App. M. 2, p. 124, 11; perf., Tert. adv. Herm. 28.

com-pernis, e, adj. [perna], with the knees bent inwards, knock-kneed, Lucil. ap. Non. p. 26, 3; Plaut. Fragm. ap. Fest. p. 375, 20 Müll.; Varr. L. L. 9, § 10 Müll.

* com-perpĕtŭus, a, um, adj., coeternal, Prud. Apoth. 339.

compertē, adv., v. comperio fin.

1. compertus, a, um, v. comperio.

2. compertus, ūs, m. [comperio], experience, personal knowledge (late Lat. and very rare): compertu evidentia, App. M. 1, p. 103 fin.

1. com-pēs (conp-), pĕdis, f. (m. acc. compedem meum, Vulg. Thren. 3, 7; plur. compedes parati, Lact. Mort. Persec. c. 21), a (wooden) fetter or shackle, for the feet (usu. in plur.).

  1. I. Prop., nom. and acc.: jubete huic crassas conpedis inpingier, Plaut. Capt. 3, 5, 76: ut istas conpedis Tibi adimam, id. ib. 5, 4, 30; id. Men. 1, 1, 4; id. Pers. 2, 3, 17; Ter. Phorm. 2, 1, 19; gen. conpedium, Plaut. Pers. 3, 3, 15, abl.: conpedibus levior filius, id. Capt. 5, 4, 28; Cato ap. Gell. 11, 18, 18; Hor. Ep. 1, 16, 77; Juv. 10, 182.
    In sing. gen. compedis, Claud. in Eutr. prol. 2, 3; acc. compedem, Vulg. Thren. 3, 7; abl.: durā compede, Tib. 1, 7, 42: validā, id. 2, 6, 25; Hor. Epod. 4, 4; Ov. Tr. 4, 1, 5: magnā, Juv. 11, 80 (nom. and dat. of sing. apparently not in use).
    Prov.: compedes, quas ipse fecit, ipsus ut gestet faber, Aus. Idyll. 7 fin.
  2. II. Trop., fetlers, bonds, bands, chains: corporis, Cic. Tusc. 1, 31, 75: ipsum Philippum compedes eas (urbes) Graeciae appellare, Liv. 32, 37, 4: grata (of the chains of love), Hor. C. 1, 33, 14: gratā compede vinctum aliquem puella tenet, id. ib. 4, 11, 24: nivali compede vinctus Hebrus, id. Ep. 1, 3, 3: aërias corpori imponere, of adverse winds, Varr. ap. Non. p. 28, 13.
    And of a hinderance in gen.: has compedes, fasces inquam hos laureatos, etc., Cic. Att. 8, 3, 5.
    1. B. As a female ornament of silver, Plin. 33, 12, 54, § 151.

2. compes, i. q. compos, acc, to Prisc. 1, p. 553.

compesco, pescui (pescitum, Prisc. p. 887 P.), 3, v. a. [compes], to fasten together, to confine, hold in check, to repress, curb, restrain (mostly poet. or in post-Aug. prose; not in Cic.; the words quoted as from Cic. by Quint. 11, 3, 169: quin compescitis vocem istam? ap. Cic. himself, Rab. Perd. 8, 18, are: quin continetis vocem).

  1. I. Lit.: ramos fluentes, i. e. to clip, prune, Verg. G. 2, 370; Col. 5, 6, 11: spatiantia bracchia, Ov. M. 14, 630: ignibus ignes, id. ib. 2, 313: incendia, Plin. Ep. 10, 33 (43), 2: mare, Hor. Ep. 1, 12, 16: luxuriosam vitem fructu, Col. 4, 21, 2; cf. Plin. 14, 20, 25, § 124: harundinem, Col. 4, 32, 5; cf.: coërceo cretam, to tread, stamp, Titin. ap. Non. p. 245, 32: equum angustis habenis, Tib. 1, 4, 11: suos ocellos, Prop. 1, 16, 31: seditiosum civem, Quint. 11, 1, 40; cf. legiones, Suet. Calig. 1: multitudinem, id. Caes. 16.
  2. II. Trop., to suppress, repress, restrain, check, etc.: seditionem exercitūs verbo uno, Tac. A. 1, 42: hostiles motus per legatos, Suet. Tib. 37: sitim multā undā, Ov. M. 4, 102: maledicta hinc aufer; linguam compescas face, Plaut. Poen. 5, 2, 75; cf. querellas. * Lucr. 3, 954 Lachm.: tristitiam, Ov. M. 9, 396: clamorem, Hor. C. 2, 20, 23: risum, id. S. 2, 8, 63; and: vino dolores, Tib. 1, 2, 1: animam frenis et catenā, Hor. Ep. 1, 2, 63: mentem, id. C. 1, 16, 22: scelera, Quint. 12, 1, 26: ardorem (together with temperavit vim suam), Tac. Agr. 8: mores dissolutos vi, Phaedr. 1, 2, 12.
          1. (β) With inf.: cave malum et compesce in illum dicere injuste, cease, forbear, Plaut. Bacch. 3, 3, 59.

compĕtens, v. competo fin.

compĕtenter, adv., v. competo fin.

compĕtentĭa, ae, f. [competo] (postclass.),

  1. I. a meeting together, agreement: membrorum inter se, symmetry, Gell. 1, 1, 3; cf. Macr. Somn. Scip. 1, 19, 21.
  2. II. Esp., of the stars, conjunction, aspect: nasci ad eandem competentiam (sc. siderum), Gell. 14, 1, 26; Macr. Somn. Scip. 1, 6, 24 al.

compĕtītĭo, ōnis, f. [competo] (late Lat.).

  1. I. An agreement, Sid. Ep. 2, 9.
  2. II. A judicial demand, Cod. Th. 2, 23, 1.
  3. III. Rivalry, Ambros. de Elia, 21, 79.

compĕtītor, ōris, m. [competo],

  1. I. a rival, competitor (in good prose); in gen., Cic. Off. 1, 12, 38; id. Planc. 4, 9; id. Att. 1, 1, 1; Liv. 6, 41, 2; 37, 57, 15; Quint. 3, 7, 2; 7, 1, 29; 9, 2, 97; Suet. Caes. 13; 19; Dig. 50, 2, 3, § 2.
  2. II. Esp., a plaintiff, Cod. Th. 10, 9, 2.

* compĕtītrix, īcis, f. [competitor], a female competitor, Cic. Mur. 19, 40.

com-pĕto (conp-), īvi or ii, ītum, 3, v. a. and n. (first common since the Aug. per.; very rare before that time; not found in Cic., and perh. not in the poets).

  1. I. Act., to strive after something in company or together (post-class. and very rare): unum locum, Just. 13, 2, 1: unam speciosam (puellam), Aur. Vict. Vir. Ill. 59: bona, Cod. Th. 10, 10, 27, § 6.
  2. II. Neutr., to meet or come together.
    1. A. Lit. (very rare): ubi viae competunt, tum in compitis sacrificatur, Varr. L. L. 6, § 25 Müll.: ubi recti angulorum conpetant ictuus, Plin. 2, 18, 16, § 80: si cacumina harundinum in unum competunt, Col. 4, 17, 1; cf. id. 2, 2, 9.
    2. B. Trop.
      1. 1. Of time, to coincide, agree, meet, to happen, etc.; constr. with cum, the dat., in, or absol.: tempora reputantibus initium finemque miraculi cum Othonis exitu competisse, Tac. H. 2, 50 fin.: fasti adeo turbati, ut neque messium feriae aestati, neque vindemiarum auctumno competerent, Suet. Caes. 40: si competant coitus lunae in novissimum diem brumae, Plin. 16, 39, 74, § 191; 18, 26, 63, § 232; cf. impers.: si ita competit, ut idem ille, qui sanare potest, disserat, Sen. Ep. 75, 6.
      2. 2. Of other things, to agree or coincide with something, to answer to it: tanto Othonis animo nequaquam corpus aut habitus competiit, Suet. Oth. 12.
        Hence, absol., to be qualified, competent, appropriate, fit, suitable, to correspond: neque animo neque auribus aut linguā conpetere, Sall. H. 1, 88 Dietsch; Tac. A. 3, 46: dux velut captus animi non linguā, non auribus competere, id. H. 3, 73: aut assumere in causam naturas, quā competent, aut mitigare, quā repugnabunt, Quint. 4, 1, 17: ut vix ad arma capienda aptandaque pugnae competeret animus, Liv. 22, 5, 3: ei loci situs ita competit, Col. 8, 17, 3; cf. id. 9, 1, 1; 9, 5, 1: si cujusquam neptium suarum competeret aetas, Suet. Aug. 31; Col. 1, 6, 23; cf. id. 2, 8, 4; 2, 18, 2; 2, 20, 4; 4, 29 fin.
      3. 3. To belong, be due to: actionem competere in equitem Romanum, Quint. 3, 6, 11: mihi adversus te actio competit, Dig. 19, 1, 25: poena competit in aliquem, App. M. 10, p. 243, 40: hereditas competit, alicui, Eum. Pan. Const. 4: libertas servo competere potest, Just. Inst. 1, 5, 1.
        Hence,
      1. 1. com-pĕtens, entis, P. a.
        1. a. Corresponding to: personae rebus, App. Flor. 16: ratio etymologiae cum sententiā vocabuli, Gell. 19, 13, 3.
          Comp., Auct. Pan. Maxim. et Const. 7.
        2. b. Competent, legal: judex, Dig. 2, 1, 19: tribunal, ib. 3, 3, 35, § 2.
      2. 2. compĕten-ter, adv., suitably, properly, becomingly (post-class.): consulere alicui, Dig. 24, 3, 22: punire, ib. 22, 5, 16.
        * Comp.: disserere, Hier. adv. Helv. 2.
        * Sup.: uti Platone, App. Mag. p. 316, 22.

compĕtum, v. compitum.

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